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solanum symonii

Australian plants used for medicinal, cultural, or shamanic reasons

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solanum symonii

Postby philly » Tue Mar 21, 2006 3:39 pm

http://www.flickr.com/photos/killuairean/97034387

at first i thought this was an olive tree and then wondered if it was a kangaroo apple. it was a sprawling but somehow elegant shrub at the edge of a coastal lake south of mandurah with lots of purple-black egg-shaped fruit and smooth leaves that stood verticle on the stems. the fruit was very sweet and strong smelling.

according to a survey of plants collected at ceduna symonii was found to have comparable levels of solasodine in its leaves to s. aviclare (0.8%) but much less in the fruit (aust. j. bot. 1978, 26, 723-54). this chemical has been exploited by the pharm industry in the synthesis of steroidal hormones. while not necessarily an entheogen this is an inviting and probably useful plant (unlike some of her more surly and spiky sisters in this genus). i envisaged a sweet chutney that doubles as a contraceptive :wink:

i still haven't worked out the secret of germinating native solanaceae - I thought that since they loved disturbed/roadside areas that they would be as easy to grow as northern hemisphere nightshades.

i've tried making smoke water from 2 exotic weeds but without success. I'm still a bit of a gardening novice. Does it matter what kind of smoke you use?

Apart from s. symonii my other projects are anthocercis, duboisia and alyxia. No luck with germination :cry:
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Postby Ed Dunkel » Tue Mar 21, 2006 5:55 pm

Try letting the fruit overripe/rott a bit (like with tomatoes), remove the fleshy bits from the seed in a seive and dry the seeds on paper/tissue.

Sow seeds and you should get a fair few coming up (for kangaroo apples this seemed to work well)
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Postby prier » Wed Aug 09, 2006 12:05 pm

I like collecting solanum species (or anything from solanaceae really) and collecting natives, pity there seems to be very few good psychoactive solanums.
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Postby philly » Mon Aug 14, 2006 3:18 am

thanks to ed's advice i have some very healthy symoniis coming along (see http://www.anthocercis.org/detail.php?p ... um/symonii ).

i like growing native solanaceae too - although i don't know of anything psychoactive in the solanum genus. some are good traditional foods and medicines, but who knows? maybe it depends on what you mean by 'psychoactive'. the chemical constituents in australian solanaceae can vary depending on where they are growing, it's amazing the way duboisia and anthocercis can generate different alkaloids depending on their climate and the minerals in the soil. i guess that is one of the many reasons why they are so fascinating and demand such respect and devotion...
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Postby the1after909 » Mon Aug 14, 2006 2:18 pm

Bongwater did the trick! :lol: Has anyone else tried this method?
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